J. Blustein

Teaching Materials Archive

Assessment Materials (by J. Blustein)

Contents

Student Peer-Assessment

Graduate Peer-Assessment

Oral Presentations

Students use these to evaluate each other's oral presentations in my seminar classes.  Students know that these are the criteria I use to grade their presentations because I tell them so and they get copies of the forms with their syllabus.

I use a more current version of the form than the one included here.  If you want the latest version then please ask me for it by e-mail.

Latest version: 2009-04-01
PDF version of oral presentation grading form
PostScript version of oral presentation grading form
LaTeX source file for oral presentation grading form

See also graduate teaching assessment forms

Undergraduate Peer-Assessment

Oral Presentations
Students use these to evaluate each others' oral presentations in my some of my senior undergraduate courses.  Students present in pairs for a short time (15 minutes).  This form is adapted from the graduate form (above).
Latest version: 2006-06-06
PDF version of paired undergraduate oral presentation grading form
PostScript version of paired undergraduate oral presentation grading form
LaTeX source file for paired undergraduate oral presentation grading form

Teaching Assessment

All of these assessments are anonymous.  (At Dalhousie U. student evaluation of faculty used for tenure and promotion must be signed, unless the faculty member waives that right.)  I insist on anonymous evaluations during the course because I feel it gives me more useful feedback with which to tune the course.  I make sure that the forms are anonymous by telling students not to put their names on them, and by how I collect the forms.

Students may complete the forms in the classroom (in class-time or when they have finished answering questions on the test) or in their own time.  If they complete them during class then the students put the forms into a single shared envelope that is far away from me.  (I collect the test papers myself but students put the forms into the envelope themselves.) Students may also insert forms into the envelope at the start of the next class or by slipping them under my office door.  Of course I never read the forms until everyone has had enough time to submit them.

I find discussing the general results and most prominent points from the surveys helps the students to get more out of the course.

On the advice of my former dean (Jacob Slonim) I do not conduct end-of-course or final exam assessments of my own.  My Faculty conducts a course evaluation during one of the last lectures each semester.

Graduate Teaching Assessment

Mid-semester
PDF version of graduate mid-semester evaluation
PostScript version of graduate mid-semester evaluation
LaTeX source file for graduate mid-semester evaluation

See also graduate peer assessment forms

Undergraduate Teaching Assessment

Mid-semester (Paper)
PDF version of undergraduate mid-semester evaluation
PostScript version of undergraduate mid-semester evaluation
LaTeX source file for undergraduate mid-semester evaluation
Mid-semester (PDF form)
Latest version: 2011-07-06
PDF form version of undergraduate mid-semester evaluation
LaTeX source file for PDF form version of undergraduate mid-semester evaluation
Post-test
Note: the post-test evaluation is not covered by the creative commons license.
PDF version of post-test evaluation
PostScript version of post-test evaluation
LaTeX source file for post-test evaluation

Notes

Please tell me if you find these material useful, or if you have suggestions for other materials I should host here.

Creative Commons License
Except for the post-test form, all of the assesment instruments linked to from this webpage are licensed under a Creative Commons License.  They can be used for commercial purposes only with my express permission.

Acknowledgments

The graduate oral presentation form
benefited from suggestions by Norm Scrimger (at Dalhousie).
The undergraduate oral presentation form
The mid-semester forms
had their genesis in a form created by Guy Zimmerman at Bowling Green State University's Computer Science Department.  Ron Conway (also of BGSU's CS Dept.) recommended the start/stop/continue questions.
The post-test form
is adapted from Figure 1 of Examinations: Accentuating the Positive by McMullen-Pastrick and Gleason in Teaching College: Collected Readings for the New Instructor, Neff and Weimer (eds.), Magna Publications, Inc. (1990).

See Also


http://www.cs.dal.ca/~jamie/teach/JBlustein/Assesment/README.html

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Created on 05 May 2002 by J. Blustein.
Last updated on 12 July 2012 by J. Blustein.